Why Are All The Black Kids…review

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Hello everyone! Welcome to the Book Nook. Today we are going to be doing a review on Why Are All The Black Kids Sitting Together In The Cafeteria by Beverly Daniel Tatum. Yes, I know. It’s a long title. This book is a non-fiction book about racism and the conversations that surround racism. I read this book because I am currently participating in a reading challenge and one of the challenges is to read a non-fiction book about anti-racism. This was one of the many books I have seen floating around on the subject and it had an interesting title so I decided to go for it. Before we get into it, I encourage you all to comment down below and tell me your thoughts. Also, make sure you are following the Book Nook on WordPress and Instagram (@thebooknook221) so you don’t miss any of my reviews in the future. So, without further ado, let’s get started.

As I said before, this book is about conversations and situations surrounding racism, so my review may be a little different from previous reviews. The last time I reviewed a book similar to this was Black Pain by Terrie Williams (review here). As a black woman this book was very relatable. When it came to talking about racism in the black community Tatum touched on colorism, systemic injustice, identity issues, etc. What I liked is that she mentioned how children don’t really see color at a young age until it’s brought up by society. She also mentioned how a lot of parents, specifically white parents, do more harm than good when they teach their children to be “color blind”. So basically, a lot of our perceptions about other races are taught and not innate. One thing I found interesting was Tatum’s use of “de-emphasizing blackness”; where black children will purposely distance themselves from things that are stereo-typically attributed to black culture. There was this one story she mentioned where a young man decided to participate in track and field instead of basketball (a stereotypical sport for black men) and when he did go out for track, it was distance running instead of sprinting. Unfortunately, he did still encountered racism. This is the sad and unfortunate truth for a lot of black people. They feel as though they need to distance themselves from certain aspects of black culture in order to appear “less threatening.” Even when you have “made it” (got a college degree, making six figures, living in a nice neighborhood, etc.) people are still going to see you as black first and judge accordingly. As I was reading, I was reminded of the Black Kids by Christina Hammonds Reed (review here) where the main character couldn’t really relate to the black experience because she didn’t live it. Her and her sister grew up in a predominately white neighborhood, she had white friends and she went to a white school. Ironically, she was also the only black kid who didn’t sit at the “black table.”

Another thing that Tatum mentioned that I found intriguing was the fact even as adults, black people will still sit together at a lunch table. It makes sense, however, especially if you are in a job that is predominately white. You want to be among people who can relate to you and understand your problems.

I did appreciate seeing great examples of white allies who support black individuals and who genuinely have an interest in understanding the lives of black people. I also appreciated Tatum talk about racism when it came to other people of color; Asian Americans, Native Americans, Latinx, etc. The statistics and personal stories that were shared really opened my eyes to the plight of other minority groups.

I honestly can go on and on about what I learned from this book but this review would be entirely too long. It did take me…I want to say, 1.5-2 weeks to get through it. Mostly because I started reading another book but I am glad that I gave this book a try. I’m not going to give this book a traditional rating, however. I will just say that it was an eye-opener. There are so many books on anti-racism out there but I would recommend this one to read if anyone is interested.

Until next time!

A Court of Silver Flame review

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Hello everyone! Welcome to the Book Nook. Today we are going to be doing a review on the latest installment to the A Court of Thorns and Roses series, A Court of Silver Flame by Sarah J. Maas. There has been so so SO much talk surrounding this book over the past few months it had everyone on edge. And those little snippets from the book that were being posted on Bookstagram only heightened everyone’s anxiety. ACOSF came out last Tuesday, the 16th and people were going crazy over it! I finally received my copy on Friday so I cleared my scheduled and spent the weekend with my head buried between the covers. And I have to say…Mass did not disappoint with this one. Before we get started, I encourage you all to comment down below and tell me your thoughts. Also, make sure you are following the Book Nook here and on instagram (@thebooknook221) that way you don’t miss any of my reviews coming up in the future. So, without further ado, lets get into it.

After the events of the war Nesta Archeron plunged herself into a life drinking, partying and going home with whoever was available. After a year of this behavior, the Inner Circle has decided that Nesta has two choices: either train with Cassian and heal herself or go back to the human world where she’ll be an outcast. Reluctantly, Nesta chooses the former. Despite their outward hatred of each other, both Cassian and Nesta finds themselves drawn to each other in more ways than one. As they get closer, Nesta embarks on a journey of healing, forgiveness and peace in this enthralling 5th installment.

I was so entranced by this book that I got all the way up to chapter 15 without taking notes. It started off that good. Nesta was, of course, that character that very few people liked in this series and I was one of them. However, after the events of the war I understood her behavior and did sympathize. So, I tried not to judge her too harshly after that. I did love seeing Nesta being more open and receptive to other people. She’s always so cold and bitter even towards her sisters. So seeing her let her guard down and make friends made me happy and it spoke to how far she’s come throughout this series. I also liked that we got to see why Nesta is the way that she is. Her mother had a low opinion about a lot of things and she taught Nesta how to manipulate and play the game. We got to see how Nesta breaks away from that upbringing and way of thinking and become a new person.

There were two things I didn’t like that had me on the fence with the rating on this book. The first thing was the sex scenes. We all know that Sarah J. Maas does not shy away from giving us ALL the details but in this book…it was a little much. The scenes were pretty frequent and redundant to the point where it was borderline annoying. And the way Maas goes into EXPLICIT detail in these scenes was a lot. So much so, I couldn’t really enjoy them because it left little to the imagination. To be honest, without giving too much away, I shouldn’t be surprised because there was a “rule” between Cassian and Nesta which would be cause for that much sex. But still. I wasn’t into it after a while. The second part was the nature of Cassian and Nesta’s relationship. Once again, without giving too much away, there was some sort of revelation about them that I thought was unnecessary. I don’t know why this particular detail keeps getting pushed in this series between certain characters but it does. Honestly, I would have preferred for them to have a normal, simple relationship.

In addition, I could also draw parallels between Feyre’s journey and Nesta’s journal. In each case, both girls had to overcome certain fears and weaknesses in order to become better individuals. I could also draw parallels between them when it came to their love interests. But the plot of their books were so different I didn’t feel as though I was reading the same book. I did also enjoy seeing the characters of the Inner Circle again as well as the introduction of new characters.

Overall, the book does live up to the hype. The story line was great and the pacing wasn’t bad. Seeing Nesta’s backstory, has she now become one of my favorite characters? No. However, I did enjoy seeing her growth and her becoming a new person. I am not sure if this is the final installment to the ACOTAR series. If it is; not problem. If it’s not; I will happily be waiting for more!

Overall, I give it a 4/5.

Until next time!

First to Die review

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Hello everyone! Welcome to the Book Nook. Today we are going to be doing a review on First to Die by James Patterson. This is the first book to Patterson’s series, The Women’s Murder Club. I love James Patterson and The Women’s Murder Club was recommended to me by my best friend’s mom a few years ago. Since I am going down my TBR list, this was next in line. There are 20, 21 books in the series. Hopefully I’ll be able to continue reading each book back to back without any other books in between. But I make no promises. Before we get started, I encourage you all to comment down below and tell me your thoughts. Also, make sure you are following the Book Nook, so you don’t miss any of my reviews in the future. So, without further ado, let’s get into it.

When a young married couple is found dead in their hotel room, Inspector Lindsay Boxer is assigned to the case. As more murders are being committed she enlists in the help of three other women; her best friend Claire, a medical examiner, Cindy, a reporter for the San Francisco Chronical and Jill, the assistant district attorney. These four women make up the Women’s Murder Club; a outfit that pursues the murder investigation away from the eyes of their bosses. When an arrest is made, a shocking twist is uncovered as well as a conclusion nobody saw coming.

One of the things I love about Patterson is that he gets right to the point. There may be times where you think the character development or the story is moving too fast but that’s how Patterson operates. The first few pages of the story definitely grabs your attention and it makes you eager to find out what happened in the story. I thought it was interesting that Lyndsay had a specific personal issue that was introduced so early in the story. I wonder if Patterson included that to make the audience feel sympathy for her or to make the character more personable. Each of these women have domineering male bosses which is why they came up with the club in the first place. So, I would say that the characters are pretty relatable anyway, at least in that aspect. With that being said, Lindsay’s personal issue may have been unnecessary but that’s just me. Now…there were two parts of the ending that I didn’t like. Without giving too much away, Lindsay had a certain relationship with a certain character and what happened to that character at the end pissed me off. I was pretty upset because Patterson made us care about this entire situation for majority of the book just to let us down in the end?! Like, what the hell?! Then finally, in the last chapter of the book the suspect they had in custody revealed a bit of information about the killings that I thought was…over the top. Don’t get me wrong; it did make me gasp. But I thought it was unnecessary. There was a plot twist in the middle of the book that I did not see coming and it did take my breath away.

This was a pretty good start to the Women’s Murder Club series. It gave a good introduction to the four main characters with good background, the storyline was great and there were times that I was one the edge of my seat anxious for more. There were a few parts that I did not like but it was still a solid book. I look forward to reading the rest of the series.

Overall, I give it a 3/5.

Until next time!

The Black Kids review

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Hello everyone! Welcome to the Book Nook. Today we are going to be doing a review on The Black Kids by Christina Hammonds Reed. This book wasn’t on my TBR list but it kept showing up in my recommendation list and I’ve seen it all over Instagram and Target. Plus I liked the premise, so I decided to read it. Before we get started, I encourage you all to comment down below and tell me your thoughts. Also, make sure you are following the Book Nook so you don’t miss any of my reviews in the future. So, without further ado, lets get into it.

Ashley is a 17-year-old black girl living in the suburbs of LA in 1992. Because of her upbringing Ashley has always hung out with the white kids and had never really engaged in black culture. However, when the cops who beat up Rodney King are acquitted, chaos ensures. The streets of LA are filled with riots, looters, cops and even the military. Ashley isn’t sure how she should feel about the situation. With her sister living dangerously close to the rioters and her friends spreading rumors about another black kid in school, Ashley is faced to ask and answer the question: who is us and who is them?

I would say that even though Ashley goes to a predominately white school and lives in a white neighborhood, she isn’t unaware of her blackness. Her parents have taught her that despite her upbringing people will always treat her differently because of her race and that she always has to be better. Unfortunately, that’s the sad reality for a lot of black people. We’re always looked at differently and it’s always our responsibility to be the better person. But on the flip side, Ashley is still trying to find a sense of identity. Because she’s black she doesn’t 100% fit in with her white friends. But because she didn’t grow up in poverty or around a lot of black people she doesn’t understand the issues of the average black person; which is why she has such mixed feelings when it comes to the Rodney King incident. She did admit to one of her black classmates, LaShawn, that she was jealous of him and to me it was pretty obvious. LaShawn may not come from money but he’s talented, smart and he gets along with his fellow black classmates. He has a freedom that Ashley wishes she had.

The biggest issue I had with this book was Ashley’s relationship with her friend’s boyfriend, Michael. I don’t want to give too much away but I didn’t like Ashley being portrayed in that way. I think it was mentioned that Ashley was feeling lonely, especially with her sister gone and her parents not really paying attention to her. But I still think the author could’ve done without it. Furthermore, when the truth came out it did lead to Ashley having a run-in with a certain individual and she finally had an epiphany about her blackness. It frustrated the hell out of me to read that scene, however, I understood why the author put that in there. Once again, that’s the sad reality of being black in America.

Sometimes the timeline was a little confusing. Ashley spoke as if she was holding a conversation with the reader and she toggled back and forth between the past and the present. Which is what sometimes happens when you’re telling someone a story but it was still a bit hard to remember what tense Ashley was speaking in sometimes. The pacing was ok even if the story felt a little long.

This was not a bad read. I liked the premise of the story and it was relatable. There was only one real issue I had with this book as I mentioned before but that was it. I liked it.

Overall, I give it a 3/5.

Until next time!

Where The Crawdads Sing review

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Hello everyone! Welcome to the Book Nook. Today are going to be doing a review on Where The Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens. I have heard great things about this book and now I can cross another read off of my TBR list. Before we get started, I encourage you all to comment down below and tell me your thoughts. Also, make sure you are following the Book Nook so you don’t miss any of my reviews in the future. So, without further ado, let’s get into it.

The year is 1969 and Chase Andrews has been found murdered in the marsh of a small town in North Carolina. All the evidence points to Kya, whom the residents refer to as the Marsh Girl, who has been living in the marsh for as long as people can remember. While the investigation is underway, the book also brings us back to 1952 when Kya was just a child and takes us on a coming-of-age journey that has led to the Chase Andrews incident.

Like I said, I have heard great things about this book and I wasn’t sure what to expect. But I certainly wasn’t expecting the book to go back and forth between the past and present. But it was a pleasant surprise. I did like Kya’s character and I did enjoy seeing her try to make the best of her life after everyone abandoned her. I also liked how even though Kya was naive, she wasn’t stupid. She was very smart, a quick learner and loved living in the marsh because she loved being in nature. Because we got to see Kya grow up, we also had a chance to sympathize with her. We as the reader understood her need to be alone and distant herself from everybody but at the same time she had a need to be with other people. I also liked how even though she had abandonment issues, she still held out hope that someone would love her and she would be a part of something. We also got to see what possible motive she could have had for killing Chase. I did like Tate’s character as well. I am a sucker for love and I enjoyed seeing their interactions and how much they had in common. He wasn’t perfect but I did like how Owens brought him back into the equation after a certain amount of time had passed.

As I was reading, I couldn’t help but try and guess if someone other than Kya could’ve possibly killed Chase. I was hoping for a plot twist of some sort but no; Kya remained the only suspect. Without giving away the outcome of the trial, I do believe the book could’ve ended without us ever knowing the true story behind Chase’s murder. I think that would’ve been better.

This wasn’t by any means a bad book. I thoroughly enjoyed it. The story was pretty compelling and I had a difficult time putting it down once I started reading it. I liked the plot, the characters and I did believe the book was bit lengthy at times. However, like I said before, we as the reader was witnessing Kya’s life over a span of 10+ years, so the length of the book came as not surprise. At first I wasn’t sure how I wanted to rate this book because it wasn’t nothing overly exciting about it. But it was very captivating and enthralling and that’s makes up for it. In all honesty…this may be one of my favorite reads of 2021. I would definitely recommend it and re-read it if I had the chance.

Overall, I’ll give it a 4/5.

Until next time!

Ninth House review

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Hello everyone! Welcome to the Book Nook. Today we are going to be doing a review on Ninth House by Leigh Bardugo. If you don’t know who Leigh Bardugo is by now…where have you been? What have you been doing? This book has been on my TBR read since it came out and I finally got a chance to read it. I have heard mostly good things about Ninth House, however, there were some individuals who didn’t like it as much as there thought they would and…I have to agree with those people. Before we started I encourage you all to comment down below and tell me your thoughts. Also, make sure you are following the Book Nook. That way you don’t miss any of my reviews in the future. So, without further ado, let’s get started.

After surviving a horrific attempted murder, Galaxy “Alex” Stern has been given a second chance at life. She is offered a full-ride to Yale. The catch? She must work in one of Yale’s most secret underground societies where dark magic is the force behind everything. But when Alex starts investigating the death of a local town girl she realizes just how sinister these underground societies are and just how far they are willing to go to remain powerful.

I liked the concept of the book but as I mentioned before, I didn’t like the book as much as I thought it would. Think of this society as the Illuminati or what have you. There are eight houses each tasked with a specific kind of magic; necromancy, illusions, portals, etc. The ninth house, known as Lethe, is the house that polices the other houses and makes sure everyone is doing their job properly and obeying the rules. This is the house where Alex is working. This is one of those books where you really need to pay attention because everything is intertwined and it’s easy for you to lose your way which is what happened to me. I was pretty confused from the beginning. To add to the confusion, it was revealed that the murder victim was connected to four of the houses. I feel as though this was an attempt to keep the reader guessing on who could have killed her (since each house had motive) but, honestly, it gave me a bit of a head ache and it confused me even more.

The first twist comes at around chapter 20 when we get to see what really happened to Alex and how she survived an attempted murder. Then another twist come towards the end where it’s revealed that the killer wasn’t the real killer and it was someone else. Then ANOTHER twist after that. At that point…I kind of thought it was overkill. However, there will be another book. So, I’m thinking that what was revealed at the end of the book will makes it way into the next book and will make more sense. In addition, I wasn’t entirely invested in the characters. The main character I did like was Dawes. But other than that, I just didn’t care as much as it thought I would.

I’m not going to say I was disappointed by this read because I didn’t go into it with certain expectations. The pacing was good and I liked the concept. But I wasn’t invested in the characters except for one, it was confusing at times and at others I thought there was a lot going on. It’s not a bad book. It just wasn’t what I was hoping for.

Overall, I give it a 3/5.

Until next time!

The Book(ish) Box January 2021 unboxing

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Hello, everyone! Welcome to the Book Nook. I am so excited to announce that yesterday my January 2021 subscription box from the Book(ish) Book came in!!!!! For those of you who don’t know, the Book(ish) Box is a monthly literary subscription where every month you receive a box filled with goodies from your favorite books that correspond with a theme. For example, the theme of July’s box was Beautiful but Deadly and it featured items from A Court of Thorns and Roses, Throne of Glass, Serpent and Dove (which I still have not read), etc. But if you don’t want a monthly subscription you can also opt to buy a one-time subscription box, which is what I did.

I bought this box back in December and due to USPS delivery delays it took a while to get here. But it’s here. So this post will be pictures of the items that came in the box. I encourage you all to comment down below and tell me your thoughts. Do you like some of the item? Do you not? Also, make sure you are following the Book Nook. That way you don’t miss any of my posts in the future. So, without further ado, lets get started.

So the theme for this month was Love Triangle. This box included items from Twilight, The Raven Cycle, A Court of Mist and Fury and The Hunger Games. Plus the book of the month.

First off, my favorite item by far is the ACOMAF wallet. IT. IS. SOOOOOOOOOOOOO. CUTE!!!!!!!! It’s so pretty and I was so excited when I unwrapped it.

My second favorite item is the Rhysand candle. Rhysand is just the best and I do believe the smell of spiced honey and bergamot does embody him in my opinion. Unfortunately, I can’t burn candles here in the dorm but as soon as I go home I am lighting it up. I still light up the Summer Court candle I received in a previous box and it still smells amazing. As you can see another item in this book is a bookmark, again, featuring Rhysand.

Next, we have a necklace from The Raven Boys, a enamel pin from The Hunger Games, a Twilight spoon inspired by the cover of Breaking Dawn and a print of Bella, Edward and Jacob designed by @morlev_art. Honestly, I don’t think I’ll use the spoon for tea. It’s just too cute to be used.

Finally we have the book of the month. It is Unchosen by Katharyn Blair. I feel as though I’ve seen this book on Instagram because the cover looks familiar. Honestly, the cover is gorgeous and so is the inside. And each book of the month is a signed copy.

And that my friends is the January 2021 subscription from the Book(ish) Box.

Until next time!

You Should See Me in a Crown review

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Hello everyone! Welcome to the Book Nook. Today we are going to be doing a review on You Should See Me in a Crown by Leah Johnson. This is the fourth book that I have read by a black author this year and I feel very proud of myself. Like with some of my earlier reads I saw this book everywhere when it first came out last year and since it was available at the library I decided to give it a go. Before we get into it, I encourage you all to comment down below and tell me your thoughts. Also, make sure you follow the Book Nook so you don’t miss any of my reviews in the future. So, without further ado, lets get started.

Liz Lighty has never felt like she belonged in Campbell County, Indiana. Her dream is to attend Pennington University and begin a career as a doctor; far away from her hometown. But when the financial aid Liz was counting on falls through she is devastated. Her only hope is to run for prom queen where the winner get a $10,000 scholarship. While pursing this endeavor Liz meets Mack; the new girl in town who is unlike anyone Liz has ever meet. But Liz realizes that the closer the two of them become her chances of her winning prom queen drops and Liz cannot allow that. Liz then becomes conflicted; should she carry on a relationship with the girl she really likes or put her happiness aside for the sake of her future?

First off, I like that the story get straights to the point. However, the main problem that I had with this book was the over-explaining. I would say that there’s a fair amount of purple prose that was unnecessary. But the pacing of this story was great and pacing is a big deal for me. I will say that I relate to Liz in some ways. Liz is very introverted, in my opinion, and she sticks to only her group of friends; which is not a bad thing. But once she starts running for prom queen and has to put herself out there, she becomes more open and she experiences things that she wouldn’t normally have experienced (dating, sports, going to parties, etc.). She starts to have fun. I think that a lot of us (myself included) are so focused on one goal that we lose sight of other aspects of life. So, I did like seeing the progression of Liz making new friends, rekindling old friendships and coming out of her shell. Unlike with The Black Flamingo (review here), I could relate more to Liz than Michael. Although I am not gay I am a black woman and so I understand feeling like you don’t belong. One thing I didn’t like was Gabi’s attitude towards Liz and the rest of their friend group. She was that selfish, controlling friend. It is revealed later in the story that Gabi had some family issues that she couldn’t deal with and therefore she took her frustration out on everyone else. Liz and Gabi did have words about it but it still rubbed me the wrong way because I know that there are people in the world who have to control everything and don’t really see the error of their ways at times. Another thing I found interesting was the events that each prom candidate had to go through just to earn a chance of being crowned. Volunteering and doing charity work, I get. But the girls had to participate in a powder puff football game, everybody had to do a choreographed dance in front of the whole school, they had to participate in drunk driving simulation with false makeup and a set design, they had to do a bake sale. If I’m being honest if I had to do all that, I would’ve quit after two weeks; if that. I don’t know if prom is that big of a deal in the Midwest in real life. But if it is, then…ok.

I don’t really have too much to say about this book except I did enjoy it very much. As I said before my only issue was there was a lot of over-explaining at times. I liked the characters, I liked the story and the pacing was excellent. Ultimately, I would recommend this to someone.

Overall, I give it a 3/5.

Until next time!

The Black Flamingo review

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Hello everyone! Welcome to the Book Nook. Today we are going to be doing a review on The Black Flamingo by Dean Atta. This is another read that I can cross off of my TBR which makes me very happy. Before we get started I encourage you all to comment down below and tell me your thoughts. Also, make sure you follow the Book Nook so you don’t miss any of my reviews in the future. So, without further ado, let’s get started.

The story follows Michael, a young gay man living in England who has a Greek mother and a Jamaican father. When he starts at university, he joins the Drag Society and takes on the persona of the Black Flamingo. The book takes us on Michael’s journey of him coming to terms with his sexuality and finding his identity and place in society.

First off, I really enjoyed the writing style. The book is a verse novel, which means it’s written in poetry form rather than prose. I don’t know if I’ve ever read a book with that type of style before but I was really into it. The author, Dean Atta, is a poet so I’m not surprised that he choose that writing form. I also liked the fact that story was pretty straight-forward and it started with Michael’s childhood and progressed into adulthood. That way we got to see his struggle with his identity and sexuality. Although, I couldn’t really relate to the main character, I still appreciated seeing the world through the lens of a gay man and seeing what he experiences on a daily basis. Even though Michael expressed in the story that he didn’t feel brave I considered him a brave person. Not just because it takes courage to get up on stage and perform in a drag show; but even before then. Even though he was nervous, he wasn’t afraid to tell this one guy that he had a crush on him or he wasn’t afraid to put himself out there and meet men. There were aspects of Michael that I admired about him.

All in all it was pretty eye-opening experience. It was also a pretty easy read; meaning if you have time you can get through it in a day. I truly hope that Atta will write more books in the future.

Overall, I give it a 3/5.

Until next time!

Robinson Crusoe review

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Hello everyone! Welcome to the Book Nook. Today we are going to be doing a review on Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe. A while ago I decided that I wanted to try and start to read some of the classics, such as Robinson Crusoe, Slaughterhouse Five, Tom Sawyer, etc. Robinson Crusoe has been on my TBR list for quite some time so I thought “why not?” I will admit…it took a lot out of me to get through this book. Before we get into it I encourage you all to comment down below and tell me your thoughts. Also, make sure you follow the Book Nook so you don’t miss any of my reviews in the future. So, without further ado, lets get into it.

The story follows Englishman Robinson Crusoe as he is shipwrecked not once, not twice but three times. The third time ends up with him being stranded on an island for 28 years. During that time, Crusoe learns how to survive and engages in a personal relationship with God.

Like I said…it took a lot out of me to get through this read. So much so, I had to stop reading around chapter five, read a different book and come back. Honestly, I believe it was good thing that I did because I am not used to reading books like this so the writing threw me off. But once I picked the book back up I got into the rhythm of things. With that being said, the story is pretty wordy but it was written in 1719 so I’m going to assume that the time period had something to do with the writing style. Because of the writing style the story was pretty boring. The story did pick up a bit towards the end when Crusoe saves a man from death, whom he names Friday. However, the story did become somewhat convoluted after that when more and more people started coming into Crusoe’s life. And after Crusoe was rescued I feel as though the story dragged on, unnecessarily.

I did pick up on some ironies throughout the book. His father forbade him from sea travel because he believed nothing will come out of it but misery; which is exactly what happened. His father also wanted him to settle down in England but Crusoe was against it. And even though Crusoe had to learn how to hunt, cook, sew, etc. for surviving on the island, he ended up doing just what his father wanted him to do anyway. I also drew parallels between this book and There Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston (which of course was written centuries later). In Hurston’s book, Janie had lived a grand life that ended tumultuously. However, she doesn’t regret it because she lived her life by her own rules which is more than what some people can say. Before he was stranded, Crusoe lived a pretty prosperous life for a couple of years in Brazil. And when he decided to take another trip and got stranded, he was lucky enough to be able to extract many belongings from his ship and essentially build himself a civilization. When he was rescued he also had a new lease on life and he became closer to God.

All in all, the book was…ok. Nothing really exciting happened until the end of the book and even then the excitement was pretty dry. It was a lot of explaining instead of showing so I think that’s why the book was so monotonous. But like I said before the writing style was different during the 1700s. Defoe does have a second book with Crusoe. If I decide to read it…well, it’ll be a while before I do.

Overall, I give it a 2/5.

Until next time!